Modern Day Architectural and Construction Design Utilizes Muntz Metal for Its Unique Properties

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In the past couple of decades, both builders and property owners have realized the wide range of design possibilities that metal brings to the table. While metal provides strength and stability, it is also undeniably sensitive to its surroundings. A metal that provides a rather good performance can corrode quite rapidly in some environments.

Despite the fact that Muntz metal (also known as Yellow Metal) is a material primarily used in maritime and industrial applications due to its antifouling properties, an increasing number of architects and contractors are appreciating the unique properties of Muntz metal as a building material too. Muntz metal is highly corrosion-resistant and can reduce the possibility of epibiosis. This means that Muntz metal is not prone to fungi or algae growth, which is quite typical in humid environments.

Capabilities and limitations

Architects and contractors consider several factors in choosing the right metal to incorporate in their design. The metal’s appearance, weight, strength, expected service life, anti-corrosive properties, ease of installation, and cost are just some of the things they consider. Read more on this blog: http://bit.ly/2fQ2H9c

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Brass Sales Offer a Stylish and Affordable Way to Upgrade Bathrooms

A bathroom goes by a number of monikers, but “comfort room” is perhaps the most accurate description. When designing or remodeling a bathroom, therefore, interior designers need to give it a sense of warmth so that it may live up to this title.

Luckily, doing so is neither difficult nor expensive thanks to brass, which has experienced something of a renaissance recently. Here are just a couple of ways you can incorporate it into the bathroom.

Doorknobs

There’s no better place to install brass than the bathroom door. The gold hue of the alloy gives the space an unmistakable touch of elegance from the get-go. What’s more, you can choose any from any number of door handle designs, from elaborate ones to more contemporary designs. It’s a simple tweak that immediately pays dividends, aesthetically speaking. Read more from this blog: http://bit.ly/2qDsBwS

Interior Design Trends for 2017 Seen to Further Drive Up Brass Sales

Brass accents have always been a welcome addition to interior design. Its rich color feature makes it an eye-catching touch to furnitures and fixtures without necessarily being overbearing. For 2017, industry analysts have forecast that this appreciation for brass in its various forms will continue to turn heads among designers and craftsmen alike.

Element Combinations

If you’re a designer who prefers mixing up elements to come up with a sophisticated style, then you’ll be glad to know that there’s a lot more room to play around with materials this season. In particular, brass is being paired up with marble. It’s not necessarily a groundbreaking idea per se, as this is actually one of the more reliable classic combinations. Read more from this blog Read more from this blog http://bit.ly/2lMghLy

The Beloved Metal of Open Seas: Keeping Ships Afloat With Muntz Metal

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It’s a harsh world out there in the ocean. Many normal metals that function perfectly on land would not survive for long under the punishing conditions of sun and saltwater. That’s why special metals are needed to keep boats and ships functioning well for many years. Muntz metal is one such metal, and for lovers of the sea, it’s a necessary part of exploring the deep blue.

The Origins of Muntz Metal

It’s easy to assume that Muntz is its own type of metal, but it’s actually a brass alloy. The name Muntz came from George Fredrick Muntz who invented it in 1832. He perfected its zinc and copper content in Birmingham, and Muntz metal has been indispensable in various industries since then, most notably shipping.

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Naval Brass: Properties and Applications

Historical records show that the use of copper alloys like brass started in Asia at around 5th century BC. Since then, alloys have evolved to become stronger, more durable, and at the same time, more versatile in terms of application. One such alloy that is known for its quality is Naval brass, denoted by international standards as C464.

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Standing Tall Against the Sea

Marine engineering is one of the more complicated technical sciences around – and part of the education for it is learning which materials are used in nautical vessels. Naval brass is one of them.

In the naval industry, brass is valued for its unmatched resistance to seawater corrosion. To suit marine environments, small amounts of other elements are added to brass to boost its performance, mostly for better corrosion resistance and durability. Higher zinc content, for instance, increases the alloy’s strength, while tin and arsenic improve its resistance against dezincification, a normal corrosive reaction in seawater.

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