Why Copper and Zinc Match: Square Brass Tubing from a Molecular Scale


Alloys like brass weren’t formed out of pure luck. Prior to the first millennium, the technology needed to make brass was primitive at best. The difference in the melting points of copper and smithsonite, also known as zinc spar or zinc carbonate, made it possible to create brass but primarily for decorative purposes.

It was only when copper and zinc were viewed as separate metals did the quest for discovering alloys took off. By the Industrial Revolution in Europe, brass increased in demand. Brass plates provided materials for applications ranging from shipbuilding to agriculture. Still, virtually nobody bothered to ask why copper and zinc made the perfect pair.
http://rotaxmetals.net/why-copper-and-zinc-match-square-brass-tubing-from-a-molecular-scale/

Tips to Take Care of your Brass Furniture

Many households choose metal products for some of their furniture for their non-corrosive and sturdy nature. These furniture items, particularly those made of brass, tend to last longer even longer than the house itself whose structure will slowly disintegrate. Brass items such as metal lamps, bed frames, and certain brass may endure, but they need proper maintenance to preserve them.

Before you even apply those polishing cleaners on your metal furniture, you have to make sure they are, indeed, made out of brass, or are brass-plated. Brass-plated objects are generally easier to preserve as these metal products are coated with brass. You will need to polish them off regularly and keep the shine using the proper cleaning products or the brass plating would come off. Continue reading

Working with Brass Extrusions Require Going beyond the Comfort Zone


The plumbing of the future won’t be literally “”lead-free,”” but its lead content would be far too low to be a major health risk. The Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act (RLDWA) is spearheading the effort to minimize lead exposure by requiring plumbing manufacturers to fabricate parts with only 0.25 percent lead content. The requirement has been in effect since January 2014.

Over the course of compliance, however, manufacturers have raised some concerns, primarily about the solderability of lead-free brass. For one, the difference in soldering temperatures between lead-based and lead-free fixtures may require changes in familiar soldering patterns. However, the Copper Development Association (CDA) pointed at the soldering procedure.
http://rotaxmetals.net/working-with-brass-extrusions-require-going-beyond-the-comfort-zone/

Tips for Naturally Cleaning Brass Sheet Metal Materials or Angles


Brass is an alloy (mixture) of two different metals, primarily copper, and is popular among makers of cookware, jewelry, home decorations, and even musical instruments. Sourced from brass sheet metal providers like Rotax Metals, brass materials have a gold-like finish, but tarnish easily.
If you think that polishing your tarnished brass pieces is difficult (and you’re not keen on using harmful, industrial-strength chemicals), fear not. You can use an array of safe, natural cleaners you can easily find around your home. In fact, if you’re in the business of manufacturing and selling brass fixtures, these are the ways you could maintain your products’ shiny appearance.
http://rotaxmetals.net/tips-for-naturally-cleaning-brass-sheet-metal-materials-or-angles/

Withstanding the Test of Time: Proofs of the Longevity of Bronze


Metal-working enthusiasts and artisans alike have probably heard from their peers that if they wanted a certain creation to last, bronze is the material to use. This age-old metal has been around as early as the late 4th millennium B.C.E., and has been one of the most vital pillars of civilizations anywhere in the world.
Materials like sturdy bronze bars have been touted for their seemingly unparalleled durability. There is an abundance of evidence to prove this characteristic. One such proof is the bronze bell from the ill-fated HMS Erebus, a Royal Navy ship that, along with the HMS Terror, went missing almost 170 years ago while trying to find the fabled Northwest Passage connecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Discovered last September 2014 and subsequently recovered a couple of months later, the bell was among the few artifacts from the HMS Erebus wreck that was found perfectly intact after the ship went missing back in 1845—its exact fate never known, until today.
http://rotaxmetals.net/withstanding-the-test-of-time-proofs-of-the-longevity-of-bronze/

When Brass Use Means Less Lead Worries

Future plumbing materials won’t be completely “lead-free,” but their lead content would be far too low to pose any form of health risk. The Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act (RLDWA) is spearheading efforts to minimize lead content by requiring plumbing manufacturers to fabricate parts with a maximum of only 0.25 percent lead. The initiative took effect last January 2014.

Over the course of compliance, however, manufacturers have raised some concerns, primarily about the solderability of lead-free brass. For one, the difference in soldering temperatures between lead-based and lead-free fixtures may require changes in familiar soldering patterns. However, the Copper Development Association (CDA) pointed at the soldering procedure. Continue reading